The Politics of Deception – Nancy MacLean’s Democracy in Chains, and how we got to this political moment

I just finished reading Democracy in Chains by Nancy MacLean. I found it a very useful and fairly alarming guide to the ideas that motivate the Republicans’ legislative agenda. What lurks behind the tax cut, the denial of climate change, the efforts to restrict voting rights, and other seemingly disparate initiatives is a very clear, well-defined vision of society that the Republicans don’t want to share publically. If they did, most of us would find it quite brutal and undemocratic. Interestingly, if they succeed in achieving their vision, Trump voters (i.e. non-college-educated whites living in economically struggling areas) will be among those who suffer the most.

Continue reading “The Politics of Deception – Nancy MacLean’s Democracy in Chains, and how we got to this political moment”

At last – the blue wave

Our wedding anniversary falls just after election day. Though we live in Ohio now, we go back when we can to spend it with close friends in Provincetown, on the tip of Cape Cod. There’s a particular feel to the Provincetown in November, with the tourist season ending, most of the shops closed, the wind freezing cold off the Atlantic, the sky overcast and the locals bunkering down for the winter.

I have a very vivid memory of how utterly desolate we felt last year (probably because we continued to feel that way until this morning). It was just an utter rout for our party, our values, our faith. We couldn’t even talk about the election – nor could we bring ourselves to talk about anything else. I remember seeing on the TV in the airport, on the way home, that Gwen Eiffel had died and it somehow seemed to seal the doom that had overtaken us. Continue reading “At last – the blue wave”